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England v Wales

Fierce rivalry, hatred, and hostility exists between England and Wales national rugby teams and their fans

The arch-rival England and Wales national rugby teams have played against each other since 1881 in a total of 130 matches. England has defeated Wales 61 times, Wales has won 57 times, and 12 matches have been drawn. Rugby players from the two giant teams relish the aggression and hostile atmosphere between England v Wales supporters. Both England and Wales compete in the upcoming Rugby Union Autumn Internationals in the UK. And England will battle Wales on February 10, 2018 at Twickenham in the 2018 RBS 6 Nations Tournament. Do not wait to buy legal England rugby tickets and Wales rugby tickets to watch your favorite national fight for glory and trophies in the upcoming Rugby Union season! Buy 150% guaranteed 2018 Six Nations England v Wales tickets.

In the Rugby World Cup, the two teams have played against each other on 3 occasions, 1987, 2003 and 2015 - with Wales winning 2 times, and England winning 1 time. In these three games, England have scored 56 points, and Wales 61. In the Home Nations Championship,1883-1909 and 1932-1939, England played versus Wales on 33 occasions, with England winning 13 times, Wales winning 16 times, and 4 matches were drawn. In these games, England scored 128 points, and Wales scored 287 points. In the Rugby Five Nations, 1910-1931 and 1947-1999, England played Wales on 70 occasions, England winning 30 times, Wales 32 times, and 8 matches were drawn. In these games, England scored 801 points, and Wales scored 808 times.

In the annual Rugby Six Nations from 2000–2017, England have played Wales on 18 occasions, England won 12 matches, Wales won 6 matches and there were no draws. In these games, England have scored 472 points, and Wales scored 323 points. In other rugby union test matches, England have played Wales on 6 occasions, England winning 5 matches, Wales winning 1 match, and none were drawn. In these games, England scored 164 points, and Wales scored 65 points. In all, England and Wales have played 130 times, having drawn 12 times; with England winning 61 games and scoring 1,751 points; and Wales winning 57 games and scoring 1,544 points.

Through the years, there remains an intense rivalry between the fans and rugby players of the two UK sides due to the physical proximity of the two nations and the history between them to date. “You can chuck daffodils at us if you want, we'll cope with it!” said England rugby coach Eddie Jones in a message to Welsh rugby fans. Former Leicester and England lock Kay wrote in the Times about the fierce rivalry, hatred, and hostility that exists between the titan rugby teams. “The Principality Stadium, or Millennium Stadium as it used to be, was always my favorite stadium to play in because of the atmosphere and the hostility,” wrote Kay.

“There is a genuine hatred in Wales of the England rugby team. It is more than just a rivalry, it is tribal and they are not shy to let you know it. It begins on the day before the match, when the black team bus with a big red rose on the side sweeps through Cardiff to the stadium in the middle of the city and the people on the streets, from school kids to grandmothers, who if they met you in person would be perfectly pleasant, are shaking their fists at you. The same journey the next day is like running the gauntlet. The pavements are packed with Wales fans, most of them not going to the game, but all decked out in the team colors. There was one year when a supporter head-butted the bus on its way through. The anthems can be spine-tingling. The passion with which the Welsh sing just reinforces that you are in their cauldron.

“You run to take a position for the kick-off. I would always be near the touchline I would look over and not three meters away was the front row of the crowd with Wales supporters waving at you, but never was it a welcoming hand gesture,” added Kay. “You look slightly above that heckler and there is another one and then another one; it feels as though the stand goes straight up, like a wall of people who are all as aggressive as one another. You want that atmosphere and I relished that hostility because if you are a confident team it fires you up even more. You look around, you smile at those supporters getting so agitated and you think, ‘We are going to do you today and it will be amazing.’ That’s what happened in 2003. We beat Wales 26-9 in the RBS Six Nations and then thumped them again in the World Cup warm-up match that summer.

Kay continued to write about the effect of a team’s momentum, doubts, and confidence and the hostile atmosphere of fans on the result of a match. “Two years later, I was part of the England team who lost 11-9 in a game remembered for Gavin Henson’s performance. It was the victory that propelled Wales on to win the Grand Slam,” continued Kay. “England had lost their swagger after 2003, they were trying to rebuild and when you are not confident, or if there is an element of doubt in the back of your mind, then that hostile atmosphere in Cardiff can prise open the cracks. You think about the momentum of games and if something starts to go a bit wrong the frenzied atmosphere builds that pressure and it lifts Wales. You saw that happen to England in 2013 when they went to Cardiff chasing a Grand Slam and were blown away, 30-3.”

“The opposite can happen too,” added Kay. “If the visiting team get the upper hand the Welsh crowd gets nervous, they grow quiet and the support begins to drain away. That tension transfers itself on to the field. England will need a bullish mentality, a mindset that nothing will push them around. That was demonstrated in 2015 when England went back to Cardiff for the first time since that Grand Slam massacre and Chris Robshaw refused to leave the tunnel. He knew Wales wanted to keep England hanging around out in the cold and dark, so he refused to move. That set the tone for the performance and Jones’ men need to set their own agenda.”

Rugby World Cup 2019

The 2019 Rugby World Cup is the 10th Rugby World Cup - in the quadrennial Rugby Union World Championship. The next upcoming Rugby World Cup 2019 tournament will be hosted by Japan from 20 September to 2 November 2019. The opening match of the 2019 Rugby World Cup will take place at Tokyo Stadium in Chofu, Japan and the final match will be held at International Stadium Yokohama in Kanagawa, Japan. Twelve stadiums in Japan were chosen to host the matches. The event offers record-breaking crowds and intense rugby action.

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